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For nearly three decades, Brazil’s Balé Folclórico da Bahia has electrified stages and delighted critics around the world with its exuberant interpretations of traditional Brazilian folk dance. The dancers, musicians, and singers routinely bring audiences to their feet—and into the aisles!—with high-energy performances combining African dance (passed down by Brazil’s black population since the days of slavery), capoeira (Afro-Brazilian martial arts), samba, and even elements of Brazil’s famed Carnival. Don’t miss this “get out of your seat and dance” party at the Rialto!

SACRED HERITAGE on Friday
Dance Numbers: Oxala´s Court, Fishermen´s Dance, Berimbau, Capoeira/Samba de Roda, Afixirê, Samba Reggae.
 
OXALA'S COURT
In the 300 years following the colonization of Brazil by the Portuguese, more than 10 millions African slaves were brought to the new country. In order to maintain their own African identity and culture, many practiced the Yoruba religion, Candomblé, meaning a dance in honor of the Gods or Orixás.
 
FISHERMAN'S DANCE
A popular demonstration, still seen on the beaches of Bahia, in which Iemanjá, the Goddess of the sea, is invoked by the fishermen and their wives who, through their dances and songs, ask for an abundant catch. 
 
CAPOEIRA
A form of martial art which originated in Africa and, during the colonial period, was brought to Brazil by slaves from Angola.
 
SAMBA DE RODA
The most popular dance and rhythm in Bahia, the samba first appeared in Brazil as an entertainment practiced by the slaves during their leisure hours.
 
AFIXIRÊ
Meaning "Dance of Happiness" in yorubá, language of West Africa. This dance has influenced most of the cultural and religious celebrations in Bahia. A festival of sound, color and movement that shows the sensuality and spirit of the Bahian people
 
SAMBA REGGAE
The most recent form of popular music to appear in Bahia, Samba Reggae is a mixture of Afro-Bahian rhythms such as afoxé, ijexá, and samba duro (with a Caribbean influence). Paul Simon was the first mainstream artist to introduce this new rhythm to the world when he performed and toured with the Bahian percussion band Olodum.
 
BAHIA OF ALL COLORS on Saturday
Dance Numbers: Origin Dance, Maculelê, Capoeira/Samba de Roda, Afixirê, Samba Reggae.
 
ORIGIN DANCE
Based on a legend depicting the creation of the Universe as interpreted by Candomblé, the African religion brought to Brazil by the slaves during the colonial period (16th and 17th centuries) and still practiced today in Bahia: "The Supreme God, Oxalá, with His sons, formed the the Universe from a mixture of sacred powder and water". 
 
MACULELÊ
A dramatic dance which originated in the sugar cane plantations of Bahia during the Brazil's colonial period and was danced by the slaves to celebrate a good harvest. Maculelê, due to its potential for violence, was also used as a means of defense by slaves against their owners.
 
CAPOEIRA
A form of martial art which originated in Africa and, during the colonial period, was brought to Brazil by slaves from Angola.
 
SAMBA DE RODA
The most popular dance and rhythm in Bahia, the samba first appeared in Brazil as an entertainment practiced by the slaves during their leisure hours.
 
AFIXIRÊ
Meaning "Dance of Happiness" in yorubá, language of West Africa. This dance has influenced most of the cultural and religious celebrations in Bahia. A festival of sound, color and movement that shows the sensuality and spirit of the Bahian people.
 
SAMBA REGGAE
The most recent form of popular music to appear in Bahia, Samba Reggae is a mixture of Afro-Bahian rhythms such as afoxé, ijexá, and samba duro (with a Caribbean influence). Paul Simon was the first mainstream artist to introduce this new rhythm to the world when he performed and toured with the Bahian percussion band Olodum.

 
This is a Rialto Series performance.



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